Tempest NeuCollins

 

Tempest NeuCollins holds an MFA in studio art from the School of Visual Arts in New York City. She currently lives and works in Ann Arbor, MI.

Download her current CV here. 

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The Process

I'm very interested in the twin notions of place and landscape, in particular how these ideas are rooted not only in the physical, but also in the less accessible recesses of memory.

All my work begins with a place. I work from photographs that I shoot while on long walks through an intriguing area, thus building up a relationship and cache of memories that I can intuitively pull upon when making the art-works.

I start the piece by creating a photo collage and use acrylic transfer to transfer the photo collage to paper, a process that is rich with unevenness, creating interesting visual complexities that I'll later work with.

I finish by using a combination of encaustic (hot wax painting) and acrylic to build up layers. 

 My images are never physically accurate representations of a particular landscape; rather, they try to capture the fleeting cultural and personal memories and definitions of that place. They try to root themselves in the energy of a particular landscape.

To be a work means to set up a world. But what is it to be a world?....The world is not the mere collection of the countable or uncountable, familiar and unfamiliar things that are just there. But neither is it a merely imagined framework added by our representation to the sum of such given things. The world worlds, and is more fully in being than the tangible and perceptible realm in which we believe ourself to be at home. World is never an object that stands before us and can be seen. World is the ever-nonobjective to which we are subject as long as the path of birth and death, blessing and curse keep us transported into Being. Wherever those decisions of our history that relate to our very being are made, are taken up and abandoned by us, go unrecognized and are rediscovered by new inquiry, there the world worlds.
— Martin Heidegger